Finding Dory Just Keeps Swimming

Finding Dory Just Keeps Swimming

In 2003 Pixar released one of its most successful films of all time, an underwater journey of a Clownfish searching for his son. Finding Nemo went on to gross over $380 million in theaters. Pixar is no stranger to the successful summer blockbuster. Hell, they kind of invented it for the animated genre. Why is it that when Pixar makes sequels, they really never fail? I’m not entirely sure but this holds true with Finding Dory.

If you’ve ever seen a Pixar movie then you know what’s in store...

It’s 13 years later and Pixar is back with the sequel. Ellen DeGeneres returns to voice the lovable, albeit forgetful, Blue Tang fish, Dory. The film follows a similar premise while changing the characters so it’s now Nemo and Marlin’s turn to look for Dory. If you’ve ever seen a Pixar movie then you know what’s in store: a whole lot of cute humor, some adult humor, and a massive amount of tear jerking.

Finding Dory doesn’t do too much new in the way of filmmaking or animation. It’s upped the beauty as Pixar always does. Its characters are solid, always staying within the realm of believability for their personality. The most interesting part about Pixar is that their stories are never, overall, very convoluted; but it’s the interiority and multi-dimensions of the story that make it so unique. Pixar chooses to take a simplistic approach to story telling and from there take twists and turns and bring us directions we never thought we’d like to go.

The film is a straight forward example of fans getting what fans want.

What Finding Dory does well is pretty much everything they’ve always done well. What Finding Dory does badly? Honestly…not much. The film is a straight forward example of fans getting what fans want. Pixar isn’t trying to reinvent the wheel here. They understand there’s a specific reason why people love their movies and they know that they don’t want to veer too far from that. (See The Good Dinosaur).

Finding Nemo found success in wacky characters and even wackier situations. Seeing fish flop around on land is hilarious, as long as they aren’t being hurt. Finding Dory takes it a step further with wackier characters and situations. Each voice actor lends a unique spin to a species of fish or mammal that we didn’t get to see 13 years ago. Everyone’s talent is spot on. Whether we’re looking at Idris Elba’s hilarious take on a Sea Lion, Ty Burrell’s down-right strange Beluga whale, or Ed O’Neil stealing the show as Hank the Octopus…and that’s coming from someone who is absolutely petrified of Octopi…no, seriously. Pixar has always done their characters well and Finding Dory is no exception.

Pixar has always done their characters well and Finding Dory is no exception.

So who should see Finding Dory? Well…everyone. The film has a little bit for everyone to enjoy. Pixar doesn’t really do niche kids films like some people assume. The adult content, and I don’t mean sexual or immature, I just mean heavy like Marty McFly, is evident in all their films. (See Inside Out). Finding Dory is a very good film, a solid film. I think that’s why there really isn’t much for me to say on it. It’s a strong animated film, with a strong voice cast. Finding Dory is just a solid film. So what does Pixar need to do to continue to capitalize on their success? Simple, just keep swimming…

 

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